• What Are the Benefits of Having a Midwife?

    Midwives are frequently involved in the care of expectant mothers throughout pregnancy and delivery in other countries, but they have traditionally been less common in the U.S. In recent years, this practice is changing and the demand for midwives from expectant mothers in this country has exploded. When you’re considering your options for labor and delivery in Arlington Heights, could a midwife be right for you? Here are some of the benefits of working with a midwife during your pregnancy and delivery.

    Personalized Attention

    Pregnancy Midwives are typically able to develop closer relationships with their patients during the prenatal period. They are less bound by the strict schedules of OBGYNs and are inclined to use that time to build a rapport with their patients. The bond is important when midwives transition to the delivery room with their patients, and coach the patients through the child birth experience. This personalized attention can continue after the birth with lactation support and contraceptive counseling.

    Natural Childbirth

    The Midwives Model of Care states that both pregnancy and birth are natural and can occur without interferences for most women. If natural childbirth is important to you, then a midwife can be the right fit. Midwives strive to prevent the need for interventions in the delivery room, including induction and regional anesthesia. That doesn’t mean that a midwife can’t or won’t help you build a birth plan that involves medical pain control or that you will be at risk if you do require interventions for a safe delivery. Midwives work closely with OBGYNs and ensure every woman gets the right care, whether that means natural birth is not safe or desired.

    Delivery Room Advocate

    Even if you require an OBGYN during labor and delivery, a midwife can be an important advocate to have during delivery. Your midwife can strive to ensure that your birth plan is honored and offer explanations and support as you progress through labor. Most women find the relationship with their midwife extremely valuable no matter how their eventual delivery occurs.

  • Signs You Have a UTI

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are quite common in women. They are usually caused by E. coli bacteria that can travel up the urethra after urination or after sexual intercourse. However, it’s important to note that UTIs are not sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). If you suspect that you might have a UTI, you can visit a gynecologist near you in Arlington Heights for a proper diagnosis. After a gynecologic exam, your provider can recommend appropriate treatment options to reduce your risk of complications and improve your comfort level. urinary - tract - infection

    Primary Symptoms

    When you go to your appointment with the gynecology provider, be sure to inform him or her about all of the symptoms you’re experiencing and how severe they are. The main symptoms of a UTI are urinary symptoms. You may notice a feeling of pressure in your bladder. Even though you may feel as though you have to urinate, you may pass little to no urine. When you do urinate, you may experience pain or a burning sensation. Your urine may be unusually cloudy or foul-smelling. Some women may experience bright pink or red urine, which is an indicator that there is blood present. A UTI can also result in pelvic pain.

    Location-Specific Symptoms

    Gynecology providers have identified certain symptoms that are associated with infections of certain parts of the urinary tract. For example, women with infections of the urethra, known as urethritis, will typically experience burning and discharge with urination. Women with bladder infections, or cystitis, are more likely to experience pelvic pressure, bloody urine, frequent and painful urination, and discomfort of the lower abdomen. Occasionally, the bacteria that cause UTIs may enter into the kidneys, which is a condition known as acute pyelonephritis. If this occurs, women may experience symptoms such as nausea and vomiting. They may display a high fever with shaking and chills. Upper back and side pain is also common.

    Complication Indicators

    Promptly treating a UTI with help from a gynecology provider can reduce the risk of developing complications from it. In women who are pregnant, a UTI may increase the risk of premature delivery and low birth weight. When the infection affects the kidneys and it is not treated with antibiotics, women may develop permanent kidney damage. Chronic kidney disease can cause symptoms such as fatigue, nausea, sleep problems, and muscle cramps.

  • Zika Virus: What Expectant Moms Need to Know About Traveling

    Are you planning to travel this holiday season to visit your loved ones? If so, you may need to take extra precautions if you’re expecting. Talk to your midwife in Arlington Heights about whether it’s safe for you to travel. The safety concerns associated with air travel during pregnancy aren’t the only issues you should consider. Depending on your destination, your midwife may recommend changing your plans to reduce the risk of your exposure to Zika virus. pregnancy - health

    Understanding the Zika Virus

    The Zika virus, which currently has no vaccine or cure, is spread primarily through mosquito bites. It can also be spread from person to person during sex. Most people who develop Zika experience a mild illness that generally resolves within a week. The major concern with Zika is the potential for the virus to be transmitted to a fetus when the mother becomes infected. Zika has been known to cause severe brain defects, including microcephaly.

    Researching Current Location-Specific Risks

    The geographical spread of Zika is subject to change over time. Your midwife can check the current risks of Zika in the area where you plan to travel. Zika has been confirmed in many locations, including the Bahamas, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Brazil, the Dominican Republic, and others. Closer to home, Zika has also been confirmed in Florida.

    Considering a Change of Plans

    If you are already pregnant, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that you do not travel to any areas in which Zika has been confirmed. Consider asking your loved ones if they would be willing to travel to your home instead. If you’re not yet pregnant, but you are trying to conceive, talk to your midwife about whether restricting your travel would be wise. The CDC advises against nonessential travel for women who are trying to conceive. If your partner travels to these areas, you’ll need to take precautions to guard against Zika transmission during sex. Your midwife can advise you of how long you should wait to have unprotected sex after your partner has potentially been exposed to Zika.

  • Is a Healthy Pregnancy Possible with Epilepsy?

    Epilepsy is a serious disorder that will almost certainly cause a pregnancy to be labeled as a high-risk pregnancy. However, it is indeed possible for epileptic mothers to deliver healthy babies, as long as they receive the proper prenatal care. If you have epilepsy and you wish to grow your family , consult an obstetrician in Arlington Heights before you try to conceive. You can also watch this featured video to learn about the precautions your obstetrician may take.

    This video follows the story of Susie and Steven, who originally hadn’t planned on having children because of Susie’s epilepsy. But when Susie turned 35, she realized that she wanted to try for a baby. Thanks to the careful planning and monitoring of her obstetrician, the couple finally welcomed a healthy baby boy.

  • Signs of Menopause

    Menopause is a natural and inevitable transition for every woman, but it is often accompanied by unpleasant side effects. Women in Arlington Heights who are of menopause age often experience hot flashes and night sweats during perimenopause. These problems can interfere with healthy sleep and daytime comfort. Women may experience unusual changes in mood. The recognition that menopause is occurring can cause some women to experience anxiety or depression.

    Additionally, menopause is typically accompanied by vaginal dryness, which can cause painful intercourse. Some women may experience frequent or occasional urinary incontinence due to the loss of elasticity in the urethra and the weakening of the pelvic floor muscles. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) may occur. A woman’s hair can become drier and some women report the loss of scalp hair. These health issues can be troubling, but a doctor or midwife can provide effective menopause management guidance. Throughout perimenopause, it’s common for women to experience irregular periods. They may only occur every two to four months for some women. Menopause has officially begun when menstruation has ceased for 12 consecutive months.

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  • What to Expect During the Essure® Procedure

    There are many types of birth control available to women, but most of them are temporary and rely on the use of hormones. If you’re looking for a non-hormonal, permanent type of birth control, consider talking to your doctor in Arlington Heights about family planning with Essure®. Essure® is a safe, effective alternative to tubal ligation for women who are positive that they do not wish to have children. It’s a nonsurgical procedure that hundreds of thousands of women have already undergone. birth - control

    Preparation

    Before deciding whether Essure® is right for you, you can consult your doctor to learn more about it. You should be aware that this procedure is irreversible. This birth control procedure involves placing a small, flexible insert into each of the fallopian tubes. This causes a natural barrier to develop around the inserts, which prevents sperm from fertilizing an egg . Your doctor will need to review your medical history to make sure it’s safe for you to receive this type of birth control. Women who have a nickel allergy may have adverse reactions to the insert material. If you decide to go forward with the procedure, you’ll schedule an office appointment for a day not long after your period ends.

    Procedure

    Essure® can be placed in the healthcare provider’s office, since it is a nonsurgical procedure. Your doctor will insert a hysteroscope into the vagina, through the cervix, and into the uterus. The hysteroscope allows your doctor to see the openings of the fallopian tubes. The Essure® inserts are then passed through the device and into the tubes. You may experience some mild discomfort or cramping during and after the procedure. Women often describe the side effects as being similar to what is normally experienced during menstruation.

    Recovery

    The recovery period for Essure® placement is minimal. Most women can return home in about 45 minutes and they usually return to their normal activities within one to two days. Protection against pregnancy does not occur immediately with this procedure. It takes time for the scar tissue to form a natural barrier against sperm. You’ll return to the office in about three months and your doctor will use X-rays or ultrasound images to confirm whether you are protected from pregnancy. Some women may need a second confirmation test at the six-month mark.

  • Discussing Essure® with Your Doctor

    If you’re considering your family planning choices and you live in Arlington Heights, one of the options available to you is Essure ®. This is the only FDA-approved, permanent, non-surgical birth control option available to women. Since Essure® is permanent, it’s important to carefully consider whether you truly do not want to have biological children or do not wish to add more children to your family. If so, consider asking your doctor about the advantages and disadvantages of Essure® compared to tubal ligation, which is the surgical method of permanent birth control.

    Before making your decision, ask your doctor about the potential risks of the birth control and whether you should call the clinic if certain side effects develop. You could also ask what you can expect from the procedure itself, including how you should prepare and what you should expect from the recovery. After receiving Essure®, you will not be protected against unintended pregnancy right away. Ask your doctor about using alternative methods of birth control until your Essure® confirmation test.

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  • Coping with Infertility During the Holidays

    When a successful pregnancy seems to be elusive, the holiday season can become difficult to bear. The increased focus on family and children can bring closer scrutiny on your own pregnancy difficulties. If you aren’t already receiving infertility care from an Ob/Gyn in Arlington Heights, consider booking an appointment. Infertility counseling and treatment can help you feel more empowered about the situation. Infertility

    Let Yourself Say “No”

    It can be difficult to turn down holiday invitations, but you may want to consider being selective about your plans this year. Consider attending get-togethers where children will not be the focus, such as office potlucks. Of course, you’ll likely be expected to socialize with your close family, but you might prefer to limit your contact with your extended family this year. Simply send a holiday card along with your regrets; no explanation is necessary.

    Develop a Prepared Answer

    Some women who are struggling to achieve a pregnancy aren’t quite sure how to answer questions like, “So when are you and Bill going to have kids?” To avoid being thrown off-guard, prepare your answer in advance. You might offer a humorous response that discourages further inquiries, such as “We’re just practicing right now,” or “We’re not quite sure how to do that yet.” It’s unlikely that the person inquiring about your pregnancy status will want to continue the conversation and he or she will likely get the hint that pregnancy is not a welcome discussion. After giving your response, you can safely change the topic.

    Spend Time Helping Others

    Even if you successfully navigate awkward social situations, you might find it hard to be alone with your own thoughts, especially if you’re dreaming of all of the cute baby toys you might like to buy. Take your mind off of parenthood for a while and find a volunteer opportunity in your community. Spend some time with the elderly at a nursing home or hospital, volunteer to drive cancer patients to treatments, or serve meals to those who are less fortunate. Helping others in need is a sure way to lift your own spirits and get your mind off that elusive pregnancy for a little while.

  • Essential Questions Your Midwife Will Ask

    After receiving a positive result on your pregnancy test, you might decide to consult a midwife in Arlington Heights . A Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) is a registered nurse who has completed advanced training in women’s healthcare. Midwives provide woman-centered care, which means you can expect plenty of questions about your own expectations and concerns in addition to the standard health questions. Midwife - Patient

    Questions About Your Sexual and Reproductive Health

    Your midwife will need to know about your menstrual history, such as how old you were when you first had your period and when your last period was. She will ask about any menstruation abnormalities you’ve experienced, such as heavy or prolonged bleeding. You can expect to discuss your potential risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). You will be asked whether you have ever been pregnant before and if so, what problems you might have experienced during your prior pregnancies. Be sure to tell your midwife if you have previously had a C-section, miscarriage, or birth with multiples.

    Questions About Your Medical History

    To provide you with the care you need, your midwife will need to know your full medical history. Discuss any medical conditions you might have, such as psychiatric disorders, high blood pressure, diabetes, epilepsy, or heart disease. Be sure to mention your allergies, especially if you’re allergic to latex or any medications. Discuss any prior hospitalizations, surgeries, non-surgical procedures, and major illnesses you might have had. Bring a list of your current medications and their dosages. This list should include prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Your midwife will also ask you for a record of your vaccinations. Once you’ve covered your personal health history, expect to answer similar questions regarding your family health history.

    Questions About Your Birthing Preferences

    One of the reasons so many women choose midwife care is that midwives embrace each woman’s ability to make decisions for her own health and her baby’s health. Your midwife will explain the various choices that you can consider for labor and delivery, including pain management medications, drug-free pain management techniques, and birth settings. Some issues to consider include who will be present in the delivery room, whether you wish to remain mobile, which positions you prefer, and how you feel about medical interventions. Of course, it isn’t necessary to know all of your birthing preferences right away. By the third trimester, you should have a firm idea of your wishes.

  • Pap Smears: What Young Ladies Can Expect

    If you’re still a teenager, your first visit with a gynecologist in Arlington Heights might not involve an internal pelvic exam. By age 21, it’s generally recommended that young ladies have a Pap smear , which is a routine screening test that looks for abnormalities in the cervix. First, the gynecologist will ask you about your health history, including the date of your last period, abnormal menstrual symptoms, and sexual activity.

    Next, the doctor performs the Pap smear. You can see a demonstration of this exam by watching this animation. The gynecologist inserts a speculum into the vagina, which is used to create space so that the cervix can be examined. Then, the gynecologist inserts a sterile swab through the speculum to take a small sample of cells from the wall of the cervix. This sample is tested in a laboratory for signs of abnormalities. It’s normal to experience some pressure and cramping during the Pap smear, but you shouldn’t have any pain.