• Discussing Essure® with Your Doctor

    If you’re considering your family planning choices and you live in Arlington Heights, one of the options available to you is Essure ®. This is the only FDA-approved, permanent, non-surgical birth control option available to women. Since Essure® is permanent, it’s important to carefully consider whether you truly do not want to have biological children or do not wish to add more children to your family. If so, consider asking your doctor about the advantages and disadvantages of Essure® compared to tubal ligation, which is the surgical method of permanent birth control.

    Before making your decision, ask your doctor about the potential risks of the birth control and whether you should call the clinic if certain side effects develop. You could also ask what you can expect from the procedure itself, including how you should prepare and what you should expect from the recovery. After receiving Essure®, you will not be protected against unintended pregnancy right away. Ask your doctor about using alternative methods of birth control until your Essure® confirmation test.

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  • Coping with Infertility During the Holidays

    When a successful pregnancy seems to be elusive, the holiday season can become difficult to bear. The increased focus on family and children can bring closer scrutiny on your own pregnancy difficulties. If you aren’t already receiving infertility care from an Ob/Gyn in Arlington Heights, consider booking an appointment. Infertility counseling and treatment can help you feel more empowered about the situation. Infertility

    Let Yourself Say “No”

    It can be difficult to turn down holiday invitations, but you may want to consider being selective about your plans this year. Consider attending get-togethers where children will not be the focus, such as office potlucks. Of course, you’ll likely be expected to socialize with your close family, but you might prefer to limit your contact with your extended family this year. Simply send a holiday card along with your regrets; no explanation is necessary.

    Develop a Prepared Answer

    Some women who are struggling to achieve a pregnancy aren’t quite sure how to answer questions like, “So when are you and Bill going to have kids?” To avoid being thrown off-guard, prepare your answer in advance. You might offer a humorous response that discourages further inquiries, such as “We’re just practicing right now,” or “We’re not quite sure how to do that yet.” It’s unlikely that the person inquiring about your pregnancy status will want to continue the conversation and he or she will likely get the hint that pregnancy is not a welcome discussion. After giving your response, you can safely change the topic.

    Spend Time Helping Others

    Even if you successfully navigate awkward social situations, you might find it hard to be alone with your own thoughts, especially if you’re dreaming of all of the cute baby toys you might like to buy. Take your mind off of parenthood for a while and find a volunteer opportunity in your community. Spend some time with the elderly at a nursing home or hospital, volunteer to drive cancer patients to treatments, or serve meals to those who are less fortunate. Helping others in need is a sure way to lift your own spirits and get your mind off that elusive pregnancy for a little while.

  • Essential Questions Your Midwife Will Ask

    After receiving a positive result on your pregnancy test, you might decide to consult a midwife in Arlington Heights . A Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM) is a registered nurse who has completed advanced training in women’s healthcare. Midwives provide woman-centered care, which means you can expect plenty of questions about your own expectations and concerns in addition to the standard health questions. Midwife - Patient

    Questions About Your Sexual and Reproductive Health

    Your midwife will need to know about your menstrual history, such as how old you were when you first had your period and when your last period was. She will ask about any menstruation abnormalities you’ve experienced, such as heavy or prolonged bleeding. You can expect to discuss your potential risk of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). You will be asked whether you have ever been pregnant before and if so, what problems you might have experienced during your prior pregnancies. Be sure to tell your midwife if you have previously had a C-section, miscarriage, or birth with multiples.

    Questions About Your Medical History

    To provide you with the care you need, your midwife will need to know your full medical history. Discuss any medical conditions you might have, such as psychiatric disorders, high blood pressure, diabetes, epilepsy, or heart disease. Be sure to mention your allergies, especially if you’re allergic to latex or any medications. Discuss any prior hospitalizations, surgeries, non-surgical procedures, and major illnesses you might have had. Bring a list of your current medications and their dosages. This list should include prescription drugs, over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Your midwife will also ask you for a record of your vaccinations. Once you’ve covered your personal health history, expect to answer similar questions regarding your family health history.

    Questions About Your Birthing Preferences

    One of the reasons so many women choose midwife care is that midwives embrace each woman’s ability to make decisions for her own health and her baby’s health. Your midwife will explain the various choices that you can consider for labor and delivery, including pain management medications, drug-free pain management techniques, and birth settings. Some issues to consider include who will be present in the delivery room, whether you wish to remain mobile, which positions you prefer, and how you feel about medical interventions. Of course, it isn’t necessary to know all of your birthing preferences right away. By the third trimester, you should have a firm idea of your wishes.

  • Pap Smears: What Young Ladies Can Expect

    If you’re still a teenager, your first visit with a gynecologist in Arlington Heights might not involve an internal pelvic exam. By age 21, it’s generally recommended that young ladies have a Pap smear , which is a routine screening test that looks for abnormalities in the cervix. First, the gynecologist will ask you about your health history, including the date of your last period, abnormal menstrual symptoms, and sexual activity.

    Next, the doctor performs the Pap smear. You can see a demonstration of this exam by watching this animation. The gynecologist inserts a speculum into the vagina, which is used to create space so that the cervix can be examined. Then, the gynecologist inserts a sterile swab through the speculum to take a small sample of cells from the wall of the cervix. This sample is tested in a laboratory for signs of abnormalities. It’s normal to experience some pressure and cramping during the Pap smear, but you shouldn’t have any pain.